Tag Archive | atmosphere

New York City’s greenhouse gas emissions as one-ton spheres of carbon dioxide gas



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In 2010 New York City added 54 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (equivalent) to the atmosphere, but that number means little to most people because few of us have a sense of scale for atmospheric pollution.

Carbon Visuals ( and Environmental Defense Fund ( wanted to make those emissions feel a bit more real – the total emissions and the rate of emission. Designed to engage the ‘person on the street’, this version is exploratory and still work in progress. Mayor Bloomberg’s office has not been involved in the creation or dissemination of this video.

NYC carbon footprint:

54,349,650 tons a year = 148,903 tons a day = 6,204 tons an hour = 1.72 tons a second

At standard pressure and 59 °F a metric ton of carbon dioxide gas would fill a sphere 33 feet across (density of CO₂ = 1.87 kg/m³: If this is how New York’s emissions actually emerged we would see one of these spheres emerge every 0.58 seconds.

Emissions in 2010 were 12% less than 2005 emissions. The City of New York is on track to reduce emissions by 30% by 2017 – an ambitious target.

For a set of stills from this movie, see:

For more information see:

Co-director: Chris Rabét (

What if Carbon Emissions Stopped Tomorrow?



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Imagine that aliens landed and gifted us a clean, limitless energy source. And instead of killing each other over this technology, we decided to immediately transform the world into a carbon-free society. This wonderous source would power our homes, industries, cars and planes, and humanity’s annual rate of carbon pollution would almost instantly fall to zero. So if we kicked our carbon addiction tomorrow, what would that mean for global warming?

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———–
Host/Editor-In-Chief: Joe Hanson
Writer: Eli Kintisch
Creative Director: David Schulte
Editors/Animators: Karl Boettcher
Producers: Stephanie Noone & Amanda Fox
Story Editor: Alex Reich
———–

Produced by PBS Digital Studios
Theme Music: Eric Friend/Optical Audio
Music: APM
Stock images from

Thanks to the funders of Peril & Promise for supporting PBS Digital Studios. Peril & Promise is a national public media initiative from WNET telling human stories of climate change and its solutions. Learn more at

What Are Carbon Footprints | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool



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Learn the basics about carbon footprints when learning about carbon chemistry, within environmental chemistry.

You can reduce your own contribution to climate change by reducing the amount of carbon dioxide you release into the atmosphere.

Your carbon footprint is measured by the amount of extra carbon dioxide your lifestyle adds to the atmosphere as a result of the use of fossil fuels, or the cutting down of trees for example.

If your country generates electricity without burning fossil fuel, for example nuclear power or replenishables such as wind or hydro, your carbon footprint will be reduced.

You can reduce your carbon footprint by insulating your house, triple-glazing your windows, drive your car efficiently or use public transport or walk, buy food locally, use LED lights and reduce the amount of red meat you eat.

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This video is part of ‘Chemistry for All’ – a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation – the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here:

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